Symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections


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General information about symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections: The symptom information on this page attempts to provide a list of some possible symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections. This symptom information has been gathered from various sources, may not be fully accurate, and may not be the full list of symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections. Furthermore, symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections may vary on an individual basis for each patient. Only your doctor can provide adequate diagnosis of symptoms and whether they are indeed symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections.

List of symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections: The list of symptoms mentioned in various sources for Group B Streptococcal Infections includes:

Symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections: Many people carry GBS in their bodies but do not become ill. These people are considered to be "carriers." Adults can carry GBS in the bowel, vagina, bladder, or throat. One of every four or five pregnant women carries GBS in the rectum or vagina. A fetus may come in contact with GBS before or during birth if the mother carries GBS in the rectum or vagina. People who carry GBS typically do so temporarily -- that is, they do not become lifelong carriers of the bacteria. 1

Approximately one of every 100 to 200 babies whose mothers carry GBS develop signs and symptoms of GBS disease. Three-fourths of the cases of GBS disease among newborns occur in the first week of life ("early-onset disease"), and most of these cases are apparent a few hours after birth. Sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis are the most common problems. Premature babies are more susceptible to GBS infection than full-term babies, but most (75%) babies who get GBS disease are full term.

GBS disease may also develop in infants 1 week to several months after birth ("late-onset disease"). Meningitis is more common with late-onset GBS disease. Only about half of late-onset GBS disease among newborns comes from a mother who is a GBS carrier; the source of infection for others with late-onset GBS disease is unknown. Late-onset disease is very rare.1

More symptoms of Group B Streptococcal Infections: In addition to the above information, to get a full picture of the possible symptoms of this condition and its related conditions, it may be necessary to examine symptoms that may be caused by complications of Group B Streptococcal Infections, underlying causes of Group B Streptococcal Infections, associated conditions for Group B Streptococcal Infections, risk factors for Group B Streptococcal Infections, or other related conditions.

Medical articles on symptoms: These general reference articles may be of interest:



Footnotes:
1. excerpt from Group B Streptococcal Disease (GBS) General: DBMD

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